Tuesday, 19 January 2016

19th January 2016 - Whisky Galore .. or is that Whiskey?

Thought for the day:"I personally stay away from natural foods; at my age I need all the preservatives I can get."

I don't mind this article particularly except for the obvious thing that jumps out at me - the fact that it is talking about WHISKEY  - with an "E".. Not Scottish Whisky at all!!  Or is that true .. read on...

All the health benefits of whiskey you wish you knew earlier… you’re welcome:
Whiskey is one of the best alcohols you can drink. Not only is it the least likely to give you a hangover, but it’s also one of the healthiest around. You’ll find that having a few fingers of whiskey every week can help to:
  1.  Avoid Weight Gain — Whiskey is a low-calorie alcohol, especially when compared to the many cocktails, beers, and wines you can find on supermarket shelves. You can drink a tumbler of whiskey without worrying about packing on the pounds thanks to its low sugar content.
  2. Boost Heart Health — Did you know that drinking whiskey can actually make your heart healthier? Aside from wine and dark beer, what other alcohols can claim that? Not only will whiskey reduce the risk of blood clots, but it will lower your stroke and heart attack risk as well. The antioxidants in whiskey stop cholesterol from clogging your arteries, and it can even boost your good cholesterol.
  3. Fight Cancer –– Whiskey is rich in antioxidants, particularly one known as ellagic acid. This antioxidant stops your body’s DNA from coming in contact with cancer-causing compounds, reducing the risk of carcinogens forming. It can also protect your body from chemotherapy, and will reduce oxidation in your body.
  4. Improve Brain Health — A study conducted in 2003 discovered that drinking whiskey reduces your risk of Alzheimer’s and dementia. If you’re worried that your brain is slowing down in your old age, it’s time to start drinking whiskey to protect your very important organ from damage.
  5. Reduce Stroke Risk –– Whiskey not only helps to prevent cholesterol from building up in your arteries, but it can actually help to get rid of any cholesterol present in your blood vessels at the moment. It will also help to relax the walls of your arteries, ensuring that your blood can flow without obstruction. One of the greatest health benefits of whiskey is the reduced stroke risk, and we can all drink to that..
  6. Fight Stress — Stress can cause a wide range of health problems in the human body, but thankfully we’ve got whiskey to kick stress’ butt! Whiskey helps to reduce anxiety and stress, calming your nerves and helping to relax your body. It can increase circulation throughout your body, providing your organs with fresh, oxygenated blood. A serving or two of whiskey can help to calm stressed nerves effectively!
  7. Boost Memory — The antioxidants in whiskey can help to improve the health of your brain, and the circulation-boosting effects of this alcohol will boost your memory at the same time. The same properties that help to reduce your risk of Alzheimer’s and dementia will also keep your brain active and young.
  8. Aid in Digestion –– Did you know that whiskey has long been drunk as a digestive aid? It was usually consumed after a meal, helping to relax the body after eating heavy food. It can also help to shut down your appetite, preventing you from overeating. Best of all, it will aid in digestion, reducing your risk of stomach ache or indigestion after a heavy meal.
  9. Lengthen Lifespan –– Whiskey is loaded with healthy antioxidants, and these nutrients can help to increase your lifespan by reducing your risk of disease. By protecting your body against disease, you prevent the slow breakdown of important cells in your body–thereby helping you to live longer.
  10. Great for Diabetics –– Whiskey is a zero-carb alcohol, so you can drink it without worrying about the effect it will have on your blood sugar levels. If you suffer from diabetes, a finger or two of whiskey will be the right choice for you!
 So - is it with or without an "E"?

(Previously reported by Nora Maynard)

Now that the days are getting shorter and chillier, it’s the perfect time to curl up with a good book and a nice warming glass of whisky - or should that be whiskey? Same thing, just different spelling, right? Well, that depends…

Before we get going, let’s define the liquor in general:
No matter how you spell it, whisky/ey is an umbrella term for a type of spirit distilled from a mash of fermented grains.
Now let’s look at some different types:
Within the broad category of whisky/ey are many sub-categories, including bourbon, rye, Tennessee, Scotch, Irish, and Canadian style whiskies. The manufacture of each of these types of whisky/ey is guided and regulated by the government of the spirit's country of origin. As a result, Canadian whisky, for example, is a whole different animal from Scotch whisky, Irish whiskey, and American-style whiskeys such as Tennessee, bourbon, and straight rye.
(Okay, so far, so good. Maybe at this point, you’d be happy to enjoy a glass of the stuff no matter how it’s spelled. But if you've ever wondered why the word often appears different ways in different contexts, read on...)

Now things start to get tricky:
American and Irish liquor producers (and copy editors) tend to favor the spelling WHISKEY, while Canadian, Scottish, and Japanese producers (and copy editors) tend to favor (or should I say, favour) WHISKY.
The controversy:
So we have two things going on here: copy editing style and actual liquor style. The big question is: Are WHISKEY and WHISKY just two different spellings of the same word, or are they two slightly different words describing two separate groups of spirits? What do you do if you're a resident of Scotland writing about Irish whiskey or an American writing about Canadian whisky?
A solution:
Up until quite recently, The New York Times tackled the problem by spelling everything the American way (with an E), regardless of the spirit’s country of origin. From Kentucky bourbon to Islay malts, everything was “whiskey” to The NYTimes. But then, last February, the venerable newspaper made a decisive change.
After receiving a raft of complaints from some serious Scotch whisky drinkers, the paper re-tooled its approach to follow that of many specialized spirits publications, spelling each type of spirit according to the way favored by its country of origin. So, while American-produced varieties such as bourbon, rye, and Tennessee - as well as the Irish stuff - kept their previous NYTimes-styled "whiskey” spelling, the stuff from Scotland, Canada, and Japan now would be referred to as “whisky.” Makes a lot of sense, I think.
Whiskey/whisky nmemonics:
Here’s a quick way to remember how some of the world’s biggest producers spell their products:
  • Countries that have E’s in their names (UnitEd StatEs and IrEland) tend to spell it whiskEy (plural whiskeys)
  • Countries without E’s in their names (Canada, Scotland, and Japan) spell it whisky (plural whiskies)
Whew! Time for a drink.

But then again.....

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